FAQs

It can be intimidating joining a new club, so hopefully we can answer most questions you might have below. We welcome both student non-student members to train with us.

If you can't find your question below, feel free to get in contact with a member of committee here.

*PLEASE SEE THIS COVID PAGE FOR CURRENT INFORMATION*

How do I start?

How do I start? 

Just turn up! You are welcome to join any of our general sessions (check the training times) to see what you think - you can come at any point in the term, but the beginning is the best time. When you arrive, keep an eye out for anyone wearing a committee t-shirt, and if you can't see one then just ask anyone wearing OUABC stash to point you in the right direction.

I've never boxed before, can I still join?

I've never boxed before, can I still join?

Yes! Many of our members had never boxed before they joined the club, so we are well set up for complete beginners. The club welcomes everyone, whether you just want to keep fit or you want to train with an aim to spar and compete.

How must does it cost to train with OUABC?

How much does it cost to train?

Your first two sessions are completely free so that you can get a feel for the club. If you decide to continue training with us, we ask that you pay our subscription fees, which you can see here.

What do I need to bring with me to training?
What do I need to bring to training?
Bring a skipping rope, hand wraps and water. Gloves can be borrowed, but if you start coming frequently you may also wish to invest in a pair of bag gloves. We recommend 14oz for men, 12oz for women.
What is a typical session like?
What is a typical session like?
A typical session will consist of: a warm-up of skipping and bodyweight exercises, shadow boxing, technique work, bag work, bodyweight circuits e.g. squats, press-ups, burpees.
For the more experienced boxers, sparring and pad work will be included in training. Squad members have further sessions which include sparring and strength work.
I'm not sure I want to spar, do I have to?

I'm not sure I want to spar, do I have to?

Don't worry! You are not going to be thrown into a competitive fighting environment from the start. Sparring will only take place when the captain and coaches feel you are ready, and even then only if you want to.

How do I get invited to squad training?

How do I get invited to squad training?

The short answer is: a lot of hard work. Despite there being large numbers of boxers in the gym, the coaches and committee are extremely vigilant and can spot those who are turning up to sessions and those who are committed in training. No matter your boxing ability, dedication to sessions is important.  A good way to impress is to turn up to morning fitness sessions. 

When and where do you train?
Where and when do you train?
The club has coached training sessions during Oxford terms, held at Iffley Road Gym at the following times:
Tuesday (all)..............17:30 - 19:30
Thursday (all)..............16:30 - 18:30
Friday (invite only)..............18:30 - 20:30
Saturday (invite only)..............09:00-10:30 Men, 10:30-12:00 Women
Sunday (all)..............08:30 - 10:30
There are additional morning sessions run by the captains.
Do I need to see a doctor or get a medical done before I start training?
Do I need to see a doctor or get a medical done before I start training?
No. Boxing is a hard sport and if you have any serious medical problems we recommend you use your own judgment as to whether this sport is for you before you attend training. However, we do not require any of our members to prove they are fit to TRAIN. Once you reach a level at which you're ready to start sparring (as decided by the coaches), the club will arrange for you to have a medical done to ensure you are fit to box.
What is the difference between amateur and white collar boxing?
What is the difference between amateur and white collar boxing?
There are three main 'types' of boxing: white collar, amateur, professional. Most professional boxers start out competing as amateur boxers. Amateur boxing is regulated by England Boxing, and only EB licensed boxers can fight in amateur bouts (when you are 'medicalled' by the club, you register for this license). White collar boxing is unlicensed boxing, often featuring people with minimal experience and training, and has no central governing body. White collar shows are often one-off events.​
We do not endorse white collar boxing.​ White collar shows have much less regulation, and as a result can be much more dangerous than amateur boxing. Also, having previous experience as a white collar boxer can raise issues when applying for an amateur license (see the England Boxing rule book for more details). A licensed amateur boxer runs the risk of losing their license if they compete in a white collar bout.